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Press

The Deli Magazine

 Infectiously poppy garage rock. There's not really any band in Portland that sounds quite like them - fast paced garage wrapped in a delightful pop punk robe, with hooks as catchy and toe-tapping as the next.

Portland Mercury

With guitars distorted to the hilt and a new hook around every corner, Debt Sounds documents a band with punk ideals and an aversion to self-promotion, shedding its reticence and going for it. Juxtaposed against the band’s post-punk pulse and fuzzy Weezer riffs, Pantenburg’s songs are sweet ’n’ sour hymns for the quarter-life crisis crowd, wrapped in the swagger of fading youth.

Vortex Music Magazine

Portland's best purveyors of pop-filled punk. All minds came together to create a modern-day version of your favorite fast-paced, fuzz-filled '90s classic.

New Noise Magazine

 Songs that were refined for years on the road...An amalgamation of danceable, garage toned power pop tunes akin to Weezer and Wavves. 

RCKSTR Magazine

“If you do not want to buy this album because of the great cover, buy it just because of the madly great single release. Or because of the other fantastic, entertaining and crisp songs, all of which sound like an essence of US west coast, skate culture and punk, and desire for sweaty concerts, warm summers and thirst for a lot of beer.”

Underdog Fanzine

“A catchy dynamic soundscape dominated by a combination of distorted guitar and varying volume contours, a saturation of infantile ease, lo-fi pop, morbid ballads and surf psychedelic rock.”

Negative White

“Frontman Dan Pantenburg and his two bandmates, twins Evan and Vaughn Leikam, show that even without over-producers in the studio and an astronomical budget, music from the heart, with honesty and ambition, is possible.”

Blueprint FanZine

“[Debt Sounds] has the potential to become one of the guitar rock albums of this spring.”

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“Autonomics is the synthesis of the summer feel of Weezer, the melodic understanding of Oasis, and the impetuous, rough sound of Fidlar”